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ashton kutcher knitting in a lenovo ad.

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stick with your knitting &/or crocheting … it’s good for your wellness …

"Knitting or crocheting can do wonders to promote cognitive function as well as hand health, write Carrie and Alton Barron, M.D.s, in their 2012 book “The Creativity Cure: Building Happiness With Your Own Two Hands.”



"Using your hands meaningfully triggers healthy engagement and activity in about 60 percent of your brain, said Alton Barron. The rhythmic, mathematical nature of knitting and crocheting keep the mind absorbed in a healthy way, providing an escape from stressful thoughts but allowing for internal reflection, said Carrie Barron.
While television can engage people from the outside, the mind requires stimulation from within in order to “free associate” or think imaginatively, she said. The psychiatrist suspects the return to knitting is a response to the rise in technology, much like the arts and craft movement followed the industrial revolution.
“There’s something so gratifying about taking strings and pieces and making them whole,” she said. “There’s something primitive and innate about that. The fragments of the mind also come together in that process. It’s a parallel process between the mind and the hands.”


~Find the complete article here ——»> http://www.sacbee.com/2014/09/25/6730900/health-benefits-for-those-who.html

stick with your knitting &/or crocheting … it’s good for your wellness …

"Knitting or crocheting can do wonders to promote cognitive function as well as hand health, write Carrie and Alton Barron, M.D.s, in their 2012 book “The Creativity Cure: Building Happiness With Your Own Two Hands.”

"Using your hands meaningfully triggers healthy engagement and activity in about 60 percent of your brain, said Alton Barron. The rhythmic, mathematical nature of knitting and crocheting keep the mind absorbed in a healthy way, providing an escape from stressful thoughts but allowing for internal reflection, said Carrie Barron.

While television can engage people from the outside, the mind requires stimulation from within in order to “free associate” or think imaginatively, she said. The psychiatrist suspects the return to knitting is a response to the rise in technology, much like the arts and craft movement followed the industrial revolution.

“There’s something so gratifying about taking strings and pieces and making them whole,” she said. “There’s something primitive and innate about that. The fragments of the mind also come together in that process. It’s a parallel process between the mind and the hands.”



~Find the complete article here ——»> http://www.sacbee.com/2014/09/25/6730900/health-benefits-for-those-who.html

(Source: makinology, via campbellhouse)

Tags: knitting
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i interrupted my other projects to start a saroyan for chilly mornings. this is tosh pashmina worsted in night bloom. #knitting #madelinetosh #pashmina #saroyan

i interrupted my other projects to start a saroyan for chilly mornings. this is tosh pashmina worsted in night bloom. #knitting #madelinetosh #pashmina #saroyan

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fun!

the erase case is a cell phone case you can decorate to your heart’s content.  keep the design or erase it and start again whenever you like.

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it’s finally cold enough to wear my ashburn scarf. sooo cute, if I say so myself. #knitting #ashburn

it’s finally cold enough to wear my ashburn scarf. sooo cute, if I say so myself. #knitting #ashburn

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Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “The Art of Hair”

J.D. Okhai Ojeikere (1930-2014) a Nigerian photographer, documented the hairstyles of young Nigerian women in the late 1960s. His Hairstyle Series consists of over a thousand pictures and is the largest of his archive to date. Ojeikere passed away at the age of 83 on the afternoon of February 2nd. There is no doubt that many of the hairstyles we now wear were inspired by African women. Here are a few of my favorites from the series.

-Bilphena Yahwon

(Source: ezibota, via powderdoom)

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Lena Dunham, the creator and star of the HBO series Girls, has a new collection of personal essays called Not That Kind of Girl. She joined Fresh Air to talk about oversharing, feminism, OCD, and why she thinks most depictions of sex in movies are destructive.  

Lena Dunham On Sex, Oversharing And Writing About Lost ‘Girls’

(Source: nprfreshair, via katespencer)